• The money savings from vanpooling are often substantial when compared to the true costs of driving alone, and you will also lessen the stress of driving to work every day. Riding in a vanpool gives you the chance to snooze during your commute, catch up on reading or text without worry. By vanpooling, you play an important part in helping ease traffic congestion, cutting fuel consumption, and reducing air pollution. Ridesharing is also a great way to network professionally and share business ideas and opportunities.

  • No. Vans are provided by a vanpool company that leases the vanpool vehicle for a monthly fee, which includes operating cost, insurance and maintenance.

  • The cost may vary based on the type of van, the number of people in the vanpool, the length of your commute and other factors. Fares should reflect an equal division of the real costs of leasing the van, less any vanpool subsidy. Contact your local Commuter Assistance Program for more information. 

  • Changes in the price of gasoline could change your fare. Ridership also affects vanpool fares. The more passengers there are, the lower the cost.

  • Yes, you can start your own vanpool. Register with your local Commuter Assistance Program and from there you’ll be guided through the ride match process. You should also contact your auto insurance company about additional insurance requirements.  

  • The vanpool group decides who drives the van, which can be done in a few different ways.  One person from the group can be designated to be the primary driver with one or two additional back-up drivers in case the primary driver is out sick or on vacation. Often, the group will allow the primary driver to ride at a discount or for free. Another option is for a few people in the vanpool to take turns driving. This way the driving responsibility is shared. Vanpool drivers must have a valid driver’s license and a good driving record, and may need to meet additional requirements and receive training as determined by the vanpool company.

  • Drivers pick up and deliver the passengers, and arrange for vehicle maintenance. The vanpool vehicle is usually housed at the primary driver's residence or at a park-and-ride location when not in use and can sometimes be used for personal use.

  • Each vanpool group needs a primary driver; at least one back-up driver (preferably two); someone who will lease the vehicle and collect the passenger payments; and someone who will be the vanpool coordinator (maintain ridership records in order to be eligible for a subsidy from the payment). Often, one person has more than one role. For example, it is common for the primary driver to also lease the van and act as vanpool coordinator. Primary drivers, particularly when they perform other duties, sometimes commute free (with the lease payment divided between the other vanpool participants) or pay a smaller portion of the expenses. That decision is up to each vanpool group.

  • The Emergency or Guaranteed Ride Home Program provides commuters who regularly vanpool with a free or low-cost ride home. Commuters may take advantage of this benefit a limited number of times per year for unexpected and unscheduled emergencies.

  • Contact your local Commuter Assistance Program to get started today! The Commuter Assistance Program can match you with current vanpools and contact vanpool companies on your behalf.